#5Books: Book recs for your Monday reading pleasure

So, here is another week, and the beginning of August no less — how did we get here??

Mind you, I’m still finding books I missed that were out earlier this year… like:

It Should Have Been Me

She thought she knew everything about her sister. It seems she was wrong . . .

DC Jo Boden was eleven years old when her older sister, Sarah, was brutally murdered during her first year at University. Her boyfriend, Nathan Wade, was convicted of the killing.

Now, sixteen years later, Wade is being released on licence and documentary film-maker, Briony Rowe, says she can prove his innocence.

The Boden family has never recovered from the tragedy, and they have always been certain that Wade is guilty. But Jo, who grew up believing her sister was perfect in every way, starts to question the evidence which put Wade behind bars. And perhaps Sarah harboured some very dark secrets of her own . . .

It Should Have Been Me by Susan Wilkins is a taut and pacey psychological thriller for fans of Clare Mackintosh, Lisa Jewell and Susie Steiner.

‘A first rate thriller, tense and twisty . . . Sue Wilkins is a writer at the very top of her game’ – Elly Griffiths

‘Dark and gripping from first page to last, this is Susan Wilkins at her nail-biting best’ – Jessie Keane

The angle of the documentary was the first thing that grabbed me, but the sisters, and the secrets they hid from each other sounds so so promising. What secrets did Sarah have??

Frankly in Love

High school senior Frank Li is a Limbo–his term for Korean-American kids who find themselves caught between their parents’ traditional expectations and their own Southern California upbringing. His parents have one rule when it comes to romance–“Date Korean”–which proves complicated when Frank falls for Brit Means, who is smart, beautiful–and white. Fellow Limbo Joy Song is in a similar predicament, and so they make a pact: they’ll pretend to date each other in order to gain their freedom. Frank thinks it’s the perfect plan, but in the end, Frank and Joy’s fake-dating maneuver leaves him wondering if he ever really understood love–or himself–at all.

Living up to parents’ expectations is the hardest thing ever, especially when you’re in an environment that can promise you so much more. But here, I am hoping that Frank doesn’t actually fall for Joy, and they both explore what it means to stand up for themselves. 

Too Close

A haunting, edge-of-your-seat psychological thriller about a woman who has been institutionalized for a heinous crime, and the psychiatrist assigned to her case who must uncover the truth beneath the madness.

How close do you get before it’s too late…?

Working as a dedicated forensic psychiatrist for many years, Emma is not shocked so easily. Then she is assigned to work with Connie, a wife and mother accused of a despicable crime. Connie is suffering from dissociative amnesia—or at least seems to be.

Now it is up to Emma to decide whether Connie can stand trial for her sins. But there is something about Connie that inexorably pulls Emma into her orbit. Perhaps it is the way she seems to see right through Emma, speaking to Emma’s deepest insecurities about her life, marriage, and her own tragic past. And soon Emma begins to understand how Connie’s complicated marriage and toxic relationship with her beautiful best friend Ness could have driven Connie to snap—or maybe, she is simply getting too close to a woman who is unforgivable…

Alternating between the two women’s points of view, before and after Connie’s breakdown, Too Close is a masterfully written page turner about the powerful—yet dangerous—closeness between women.

The powerful and dangerous closeness between women…. who is Ness? I read the blurb and I think the fatc that not much is said about her means she plays a more important part of this book. Is the closeness with her the danger for Emma and Connie? 

The Stranger Inside

Even good people are drawn to do evil things…

Twelve-year-old Rain Winter narrowly escaped an abduction while walking to a friend’s house. Her two best friends, Tess and Hank, were not as lucky. Tess never came home, and Hank was held in captivity before managing to escape. Their abductor was sent to prison but years later was released. Then someone delivered real justice—and killed him in cold blood.

Now Rain is living the perfect suburban life, her dark childhood buried deep. She spends her days as a stay-at-home mom, having put aside her career as a hard-hitting journalist to care for her infant daughter. But when another brutal murderer who escaped justice is found dead, Rain is unexpectedly drawn into the case. Eerie similarities to the murder of her friends’ abductor force Rain to revisit memories she’s worked hard to leave behind. Is there a vigilante at work? Who is the next target? Why can’t Rain just let it go?

Introducing one of the most compelling and original killers in crime fiction today, Lisa Unger takes readers deep inside the minds of both perpetrator and victim, blurring the lines between right and wrong, crime and justice, and showing that sometimes people deserve what comes to them

here’s the thing: if Hank survived, why does this blurb revolve around Rain? But, in addition to that, it’s the last paragraph that sticks with me: clearly the killer plays a far more important part in this story. How are the lines between right and wrong blurred? There’s so much packed into that one paragraph!

The Arrangement

Natalie, a young art student in New York City, is struggling to pay her bills when a friend makes a suggestion: Why not go online and find a sugar daddy—a wealthy, older man who will pay her for dates, and even give her a monthly allowance? Lots of girls do it, Nat learns. All that’s required is to look pretty and hang on his every word. Sexual favours are optional.

Though more than thirty years her senior, Gabe, a handsome corporate finance attorney, seems like the perfect candidate, and within a month, they are madly in love. At least, Nat is…Gabe already has a family, whom he has no intention of leaving.

So when he abruptly ends things, Nat can’t let go. She begins drinking heavily and stalking him: watching him at work, spying on his wife, even befriending his daughter, who is not much younger than she is. But Gabe’s not about to let his sugar baby destroy his perfect life. What was supposed to be a mutually beneficial arrangement devolves into a nightmare of deception, obsession, and, when a body is found near Gabe’s posh Upper East Side apartment, murder

Obsession much? Who is murdered? Note, it doesn’t say it’s Nat that is found dead. 

And that’s all she wrote for this week! What are you waiting on this week?

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