Can’t Wait Wednesday: The Art of Starving

Can't wait Wednesday- What are book bloggers looking forward to reading next-

Waiting on Wednesdays has become Can’t Wait Wednesdays but the purpose is the same: for bloggers to highlight what they’re waiting on. This week I have: The Art of Starving

Can't Wait Wednesday The Art of Starving

Blurb: More Happy Than Not meets Glory O’Brien’s History of the Future in this gritty, contemporary YA debut about a bullied gay teen boy with an eating disorder who believes he’s developed super powers via starvation.

Matt hasn’t eaten in days.

His stomach stabs and twists inside, pleading for a meal. But Matt won’t give in. The hunger clears his mind, keeps him sharp—and he needs to be as sharp as possible if he’s going to find out just how Tariq and his band of high school bullies drove his sister, Maya, away.

Matt’s hardworking mom keeps the kitchen crammed with food, but Matt can resist the siren call of casseroles and cookies because he has discovered something: the less he eats the more he seems to have . . . powers. The ability to see things he shouldn’t be able to see. The knack of tuning in to thoughts right out of people’s heads. Maybe even the authority to bend time and space.

So what is lunch, really, compared to the secrets of the universe?

Matt decides to infiltrate Tariq’s life, then use his powers to uncover what happened to Maya. All he needs to do is keep the hunger and longing at bay. No problem. But Matt doesn’t realize there are many kinds of hunger… and he isn’t in control of all of them.

A darkly funny, moving story of body image, addiction, friendship, and love, Sam J. Miller’s debut novel will resonate with any reader who’s ever craved the power that comes with self-acceptance.

It’s a bit left field, isn’t it? To say the least, I think. But what sticks with me is that this book is based in part on the author’s own experience with an eating disorder. I don’t believe that Matt has powers, I think that’s one of the effects of the eating disorder.

I think too that a story about the experience a male character has with an eating disorder is one that needs to be told.

The other elements of this make for a narrative I actually haven’t been able to get it out of my head. What do you think of it?

What are you waiting on this week?

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